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BUSINESS BUYING

Buying an Existing Business – Part 5 – Transition

Transition Time

The transition to new ownership is a big change for employees of a small business. To ensure a smooth transition, start the process before the deal is done. Make sure the owner feels good about what is going to happen to the business after he or she leaves. Spend some time talking to key employees, customers and suppliers before you take over; tell them about your plans and ideas for the business’s future. Getting these key players involved and on your side makes running the business a lot easier.

Most sellers will help you in a transition period during which they train you in operating the business. This period can range from a few weeks to six months or longer. After the one-on-one training period, many sellers will agree to be available for phone consultation for another period of time. Make sure you and the seller agree on how this training will be handled, and write it into your contract.

If you buy the business lock, stock and barrel, simply putting your name on the door and running it as before, your transition is likely to be fairly smooth. On the other hand, if you buy only part of the business’s assets, such as its client list or employees, then make a lot of changes in how things are done, you’ll probably face a more difficult transition period.

Many new business owners have unrealistically high expectations that they can immediately make a business more profitable. Of course, you need a positive attitude to run a successful business, but if your attitude is “I’m better than you,” you’ll soon face resentment from the employees you’ve acquired.

Instead, look at the employees as valuable assets. Initially, they’ll know far more about the business than you will; use that knowledge to get yourself up to speed, and treat them with respect and appreciation. Employees inevitably will feel worried about job security when a new owner takes over. That uncertainty is multiplied if you don’t tell them what your plans are. Many new bosses are so eager to start running the show, they slash staff, change prices or make other radical changes without giving employees any warning.

So why has Business Transition Planning garnered so much attention of late?

Because, what lies ahead is what many experts are calling The Perfect Storm. Consider these facts about recent conditions: Studies show that for every 5 businesses listed for sale, only 1 actually sells 84% of business owners are depending on proceeds of selling their business for their next phase in life In a survey of 300 former business owners, 75% of the owners said they sold for much less than expected For family owned businesses only 30% of family-owned businesses survive to the 2nd generation, dropping to 17% for 3rd generation.

If that isn’t enough to create uncertainty for business owners let’s add a couple of trends that make the future transition environment even more sobering. Baby-boomers are heading to the exit in unprecedented numbers. Baby-boomer wealth is held in 12 million privately-owned businesses.¬†Greater than70% of these businesses are expected to change hands in the next 10 to 15 years. The number of sellers will outnumber buyers.

Aside from sellers finding fewer buyers interested in their business, the glut will create a buyer’s market and downward pressure on selling prices and terms. As if that’s not enough, people are living longer requiring more money to sustain their standard of living, savings are at an all-time low, the global economy is changing at an ever increasing rate, and investment returns over the last decade have significantly eroded financial wealth leaving little time for those nearing their next phase in life to make up for the unplanned shortfall.

Less Than 10% Have a Transition Plan

What’s alarming, in light of the statistics and trends is less than 10% of business owners have a written transition plan. In fact, a lack of planning was identified as one of the largest contributors to the poor transition results noted above. Knowing business transition is such an important once-in-a-lifetime event, why are so many business owners unprepared? When asked, business owners’ top reasons for not addressing their transition were:¬† too early, too time consuming, and other.

The “other” category is the catch all for the emotional issues–issues related to fear and mortality. Owners fear letting go, loss of control, conflict (family transition), as well as losing their purpose and identity. These are big issues and all take time to address and resolve. It’s never too early to begin planning. Transition Plans begin with the vision or dream of what a business owner wants for his/her family, his/her business and themselves.

Each plan should be specific and tailored to the individual situation.

Done properly the planning process considers all factors, all interested parties, and the personal goals of the owners in a manner and time period that accommodates the business, its shareholders, and potential successors and/or buyers. The planning process will identify the amount of work, effort, and an estimate of the time required to achieve a chosen outcome. It’s not unusual for implementation of a plan to take five to ten years or more.

The earlier a business owner begins the planning process the greater their chances of surviving the perfect storm. Setting Priorities for the Business It’s not surprising business owners rank “too time consuming” high on the list of reasons for not planning. With the significance the business has in the life and livelihood of owners you would think they would make this a priority and find the time. The blame does not rest solely with owners.

The Exit Planning industry has not made it easy.

Historically, exit planners have been experts within a particular discipline (e.g. legal, accounting, or financial), good at what they do but not positioned to provide business owners with broader, objective planning and implementation help they need. The courageous owners willing to pursue a plan have had to be their own transition planning champion, not knowing much about what should be done, where to start, or which expert to listen to.

They are left struggling and frustrated trying to create and implement a plan. More recently, Transition Planning has improved with the emergence of independent objective experts who can take much of the planning and implementation burden off an owner. Further, they can be your champion ensuring that all the specialists on your team of advisors are working together and focused on your outcome.

Involve the staff in your planning, and keep communication open so they know what is happening at all times. Taking on an existing business isn’t always easy, but with a little patience, honesty and hard work, you’ll soon be running things like a pro.